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Newswire: Wonder Woman wants no part of this deleted scenes bullshit

2 hours ago

DVD junkies who go hunting for deleted scenes on the disc for Warner Bros.’ upcoming Wonder Woman will apparently be out of luck: According to director Patty Jenkins, pretty much everything she shot for the movie made it into the finished product. Given that Batman V. Superman: Dawn Of Justice shipped with a three-hour extended cut, and Suicide Squad was loaded up with plenty of cut scenes of Jared Leto doing god knows what, that’s a pretty surprising accomplishment.

“We’ve got the DVD now, they keep wanting to put cut scenes and there aren’t any,” Jenkins told Collider, noting that “We didn’t cut one scene in this movie, nor did we change the order of one scene in this movie from the script that we went in shooting with.” Jenkins emphasized how smooth and easily flowing the film’s shooting schedule and editing has been, once »

- William Hughes

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Newswire: Updated: A King Of Kong musical is in the works, so let’s write some songs

5 hours ago

Director Seth Gordon may have been busy helming desultory slow-motion beach workouts in scattershot big-budget comedies, but that doesn’t mean he’s taken his eye off the further adventures of his directorial debut, The King Of Kong. For years, there’s been discussion of turning Gordon’s documentary about the competition for the Donkey Kong world championship into a narrative film, but now it seems Gordon is taking it another direction—specifically, to the stage. IGN reports the project is being turned into a musical, which means it’s time for you to finally realize your dreams of crafting a big Broadway number based on your devotion to the old arcade game. (Though, if you keep the references vague, you could probably convince people your torch song about Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy’s Kong Quest is actually a lament for the original.)

Asked about the new adaptation during »

- Alex McLevy

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Newswire: Josh Homme gets into film composing with Diane Kruger neo-Nazi drama

6 hours ago

Queens Of The Stone Age’s Josh Homme co-wrote the theme for Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown, and now he’s a now a movie composer as well. Homme recently scored In The Fade, a German film directed by The Edge Of Heaven’s Fatih Akin, which stars Diane Kruger as a woman whose husband and son are killed by neo-Nazis. It premiered in competition at Cannes—though, for what it’s worth, our critic A.A. Dowd was not particularly impressed who called it “familiar and unchallenging.”

According to an interview with Variety, Akin was listening to Queens Of The Stone Age while writing. “I had the feeling that this could be the music that the character was listening to, It has a self-destructive attitude and somehow the film is about self-destruction,” Akin explained. ”I sent [Homme] a very early version of the film. He immediately called back saying ...

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- Esther Zuckerman

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Newswire: Carrie Fisher loved repeatedly slapping Oscar Isaac for The Last Jedi

6 hours ago

The press tour for The Last Jedi is sure to be filled with touching and hilarious stories about the late, great Carrie Fisher. Oscar Isaac unveiled one such tale on The Late Show yesterday, describing how much fun Fisher seemed to have inflicting bodily harm on him when they filmed a scene in which General Organa has to slap Poe Dameron. “I think it ended up being like 27 takes of Carrie just leaning in, and every time she’d hit a different spot in my face,” he said, miming just how much of his visage she managed to get. (For what it’s worth he also noted in Vanity Fair’s big Star Wars piece this week: “She loved hitting me.”)

“She was by far one of the quickest-witted, funniest, most down-to-earth, real human beings I ever had the opportunity of working with, and she does amazing work in ...

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- Esther Zuckerman

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Newswire: Some very good dogs won awards at Cannes

7 hours ago

While we don’t yet know who received the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival, we have learned who got the Palm Dog, the award for a distinguished pup in a movie: A good boy named Bruno, according to The Hollywood Reporter. Bruno is one of the stars of Noah Baumbach’s The Meyerowitz Stories, alongside Ben Stiller, an actually impressive Adam Sandler, and Dustin Hoffman. He is also a poodle, whose work, according to jury president and Guardian film critic Peter Bradshaw, “symbolizes the brutal submission to Republican domestic policy,” per THR. The Meyerowitz Stories’ inclusion in competition was controversial because it’s being released by Netflix, but clearly a good dog is a good dog regardless of distribution platform.

Meanwhile, Lupo, a German Shepherd, took home the Grand Jury prize for his work in Ava, and Robert Pattinson, though not a dog, got a “special mention »

- Esther Zuckerman

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Great Job, Internet!: 40 years of bizarre Star Wars fandom is captured in this great mix

8 hours ago

Wookiee and human, B’omarr monk and Bantha—all are welcome in the Star Wars universe, and the weirder, the better. And “weird” is often the watchword (in a good way) when it comes to Star Wars fandom, with the devotees of the original series setting the gold standard for devoted fan behavior in pop culture. Since you’re reading this on the internet—a.k.a. the global network for sharing opinions on Star Wars, plus some cat memes—you’re likely familiar with vast swaths of these expressions of kinship. But there’s always more. So, so much more.

The Cinefamily, a Los Angeles arthouse theater, has put together a video mixtape called “Star Wars Nothing But Star Wars,” a lovingly assembled collection of curios pulled from 40 years’ worth of fandom and pop cultural saturation. Last week we posted a trailer for it, but now the full ...

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- Alex McLevy

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Great Job, Internet!: The machines have won and Terminator 2 has been remade in Grand Theft Auto V

8 hours ago

There is really never a bad time to rewatch one of the first two Terminator movies, a pair of classic ur-texts in sci-fi action that humanity has really only matched, never bettered. So this hour-long, slightly slimmed-down recreation of T2: Judgment Day within Grand Theft Auto V is a great way to spend a portion of this holiday weekend, assuming you get over the fact that it was made by machines.

Sure: Technically, a human modder went through creating character models, sets, camera placements, and cuts in order to recreate James Cameron’s classic 1991 movie. But then, as that very film details, even a human invented Skynet. Really, what this represents is an early triumph of the machines over man, proof that even our classic anti-machine cinema is prone to machination. Machinima Robert Patrick is actually a pretty good evolution of the T-1000, and the Nathan Drake character model »

- Clayton Purdom

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What Are You Watching?: 81 years ago, the first movie camera over Everest won an Oscar

19 hours ago

What Are You Watching? is a weekly space for The A.V Club’s film critics and readers to share their thoughts, observations, and opinions on movies new and old.

I watched Wings Over Everest, a half-hour “documentary” that won an Oscar in the defunct Best Short Subject (Novelty) category back in 1936, because I’ve long been fascinated by the life of one of its directors, Geoffrey Barkas. He was a specialist in adventure footage, best remembered for directing the African unit on the 1937 adaptation of King Solomon’s Mines, but when World War II broke out, he became the head of the British military’s famous Middle East camouflage division. The unit was composed of avant-garde painters, set designers, zoologists, and even professional stage magicians, and during the North African campaign, they invented ingenious ways to disguise hundreds of tanks as trucks, built dummy supply lines and ...

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- Ignatiy Vishnevetsky

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Newswire: Boss Baby 2 is in the works

25 May 2017 4:15 PM, PDT

Good news for dedicated fans of the Boss Baby Cinematic Universe: Deadline has confirmed that the franchise’s second film is now in the works, with star Alec Baldwin set to return as the hard-dealing suit baby audiences have come to know and love.

Of course, the existence of Boss Baby 2 raises all sorts of questions about the conclusion to Boss Baby 1 (or Boss Baby: Origins, as we’ll now retroactively begin to refer to it). After all, didn’t Boss Baby give up the magical serum that gave him his magical, boss-like powers? Wasn’t the Forever Puppies plot destroyed? Didn’t the film end by jumping forward to the future, showing a generation of new, non-Baldwin Boss Babies taking the corporate high-chair throne? (Rest assured, the answer to all these questions is “Yes, yes, and yes.”)

Still, it’s not like you get to write a ...

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- William Hughes

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Newswire: Here’s what’s coming to Amazon Prime in June

25 May 2017 3:55 PM, PDT

Amazon Prime got some certified Oscar prestige last month, with subscribers able to stream both Manchester By The Sea and Moonlight, but June is going for some lower-profile films that are no less prestigious. On June 1, Prime subscribers will be able to watch The Salesman, Asghar Farhadi’s Oscar-winning film that might be more famous for the fact that Farhadi—who is from Iran—and star Taraneh Alidoosti boycotted the Academy Awards ceremony over Donald Trump’s then-nascent Muslim ban. On June 22, Prime subscribers get Paterson, Jim Jarmusch’s well-received movie about Adam Driver as a bus-driving poet named Paterson who lives in Paterson, New Jersey.

If those aren’t your thing, you can stream Urge, Ocean’s Eleven, Ocean’s Twelve, Mr. Mom, the original Mechanic, Apocalypse Now, Blue Velvet, and Bowling For Columbine.

The full list of what’s coming is below, along with a highlight ...

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- Sam Barsanti

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Newswire: Sausage Party director to get his greasy hands all over The Jetsons

25 May 2017 3:00 PM, PDT

It’s been a while since we checked in on Warner Bros.’ new animated Jetsons movie—two years of whiles, in fact—but The Hollywood Reporter has some fresh news about George Jetson, his boy Elroy, etc. THR reports that Conrad Vernon—the Dreamworks veteran who directed Shrek 2 and Monsters Vs. Aliens, before moving into more adult fare as half the directing team on Seth Rogen’s recent hit Sausage Party—has been tapped to helm the Hanna-Barbera adaptation.

Presumably, Vernon’s kid-friendly new project will shy away from the sexually explicit hot dog buns and murderous douches that marked his last film—although hey, it’s the far-future, so who really knows? For its part, Warner Bros. has been trying to get a Jetsons project off the ground for decades now, following in the footsteps of failed live-action versions from Paramount and Universal in the 1990s.

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- William Hughes

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Newswire: John Wick: Chapter 3 will dig deeper into the series’ mythology

25 May 2017 2:21 PM, PDT

The two John Wick movies have thus far only offered tantalizing teases of its universe’s crazy assassin mythology, with secret murder hotels, homeless kings, and tactical tailoring. But Chapter 2 director Chad Stahelski says the next film will finally dig into the “intricacies of the world.” That comes from an interview with Collider, in which Stahelski explains that the plan for Chapter 3 is “not so much to go bigger,” but to focus on “different subtleties” that were left out of Chapter 2. He doesn’t want to “blow up a freeway”—which seems like a specific nod to one of John Wick star Keanu Reeves’ Matrix movies—but rather make “cooler and more intricate” set pieces.

Future movies will also delve into John Wick’s backstory a bit more, but it’ll be hinted at through action instead of being specifically laid out. Stahelski’s hope is that ...

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- Sam Barsanti

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Great Job, Internet!: Sigh along with this list of 10 more movie remakes in the works

25 May 2017 12:56 PM, PDT

We can complain about remakes until the hills have eyes but that’s not going to stop them from happening. Just in the last week, we’ve written about Hollywood remakes of Charlie’s Angels, Pinocchio, Resident Evil, Scarface, and The Mummy (and that’s not to mention to endless deluge of sequels and spin-offs). But hey, they don’t have to be bad. And this WhatCulture video outlining 10 in-development remakes even features a few that have potential of surpassing their source material. And even more that, well, don’t.

Who needs an Escape From New York remake? Why remake a movie that’s persevered not due to its core concept or message but because of the charisma and inimitable quality of its cast and crew? That’s a fool’s errand. There are also remakes in development of Little Shop Of Horrors and Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, two movies ...

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- Randall Colburn

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Newswire: Silver Sable And Black Cat nabs Beyond The Lights’ Gina Prince-Bythewood

25 May 2017 12:51 PM, PDT

According to Variety, Sony’s Silver Sable And Black Cat comic-book adaptation has found a director, with Beyond The LightsGina Prince-Bythewood stepping up to helm the movie and rewrite the script. The current draft was written by Thor: Ragnarok’s Chris Yost, and a previous one came from Westworld co-creator Lisa Joy, so it’s definitely gone through some iterations. The Variety story doesn’t offer any real details on what Silver Sable And Black Cat will be about, but the two eponymous characters are relatively prominent members of Spider-Man’s supporting cast in the comics.

Silver Sable is a mercenary from a fictional European country whose real name is Silver Sablinova (because comic books are often very silly), and Black Cat is a world-class thief named Blackagar Catagon (she’s actually named Felicia Hardy, but that’s not as funny). Also, while both characters have very close relationships »

- Sam Barsanti

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Movie Review: Hermia & Helena is a charming ode to sorting yourself out abroad

25 May 2017 12:35 PM, PDT

There are filmmakers who draw the same motifs and plot points through every movie, like an artist who works with one brush and one set of watercolors, so that with every new picture, the colors become more intermixed. The prolific South Korean writer-director Hong Sang-soo (Right Now, Wrong Then, The Day He Arrives) is the most notorious example of this today, as half or more of his movies are about the romantic travails of backpack-wearing alter egos (often arthouse filmmakers) who are only in town briefly and could really use a drink and some company. A less extreme case is Matías Piñeiro, the Argentine writer-director of The Princess Of France, Viola, and Rosalinda, small films that revolve around Shakespeare plays being adapted or rehearsed by troupes of young artists. Although it’s largely set in New York City instead of Piñeiro’s usual Buenos Aires and leans less on the »

- Ignatiy Vishnevetsky

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Newswire: Internet reacts with predictable restraint to female-only Wonder Woman screening

25 May 2017 12:07 PM, PDT

The first film of the modern superhero era to feature both a female protagonist and a female director, Wonder Woman is a major milestone for the DC cinematic universe. And the Alamo Drafthouse in Austin, Texas is celebrating by creating its own mini-Themyscira and hosting a one-night-only “female only” screening of the movie. Birth.Movies.Death, the Alamo’s in-house movie site, has the event description:

The most iconic superheroine in comic book history finally has her own movie, and what better way to celebrate than with an all-female screening?

Apologies, gentlemen, but we’re embracing our girl power and saying “No Guys Allowed” for one special night at the Alamo Ritz. And when we say “Women (and People Who Identify As Women) Only,” we mean it. Everyone working at this screening—venue staff, projectionist, and culinary team—will be female.

So lasso your geeky girlfriends together and grab your »

- Katie Rife

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Great Job, Internet!: Arrival’s mysteries are still worth exploring

25 May 2017 12:05 PM, PDT

Arrival remains a rare case of a critically acclaimed, successful sci-fi movie that shirked action or horror in favor of the genre’s headier pleasures. It’s a dreamy, philosophical, sometimes melancholy film, known as much for the mood created by its elliptical editing as the twist ending that editing hid. An excellent new installment of Lessons From The Screenplay compares not just Arrival’s filmed version with its written version but also its source material, Ted Chiang’s novella Story Of Your Life. The result manages to parse how director Denis Villeneuve and his team maintained such a delicately intellectual film’s tone while still functioning as a crowd-pleasing popcorn sci-fi flick. (Spoilers ensue.)

The video details how screenplay writer Eric Heisserer tweaked three key elements when writing the movie: the perspective, which in the film follows along as Amy Adams’ character grasps the heptapods’ language and in the »

- Clayton Purdom

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Movie Review: Adios revisits Buena Vista Social Club with few insights

25 May 2017 12:00 PM, PDT

It’s been 20 years since the Buena Vista Social Club album made Cuban music a crossover sensation in the U.S. (for the first time since the ’50s), and 18 years since Wim Wenders’ documentary of the same title played in theaters. What’s become of the gifted musicians who found renewed or belated fame and fortune as a result of those projects? Buena Vista Social Club: Adios seeks to fill in the gap, but this sequel’s subtitle is all too literal. Many of the group’s most prominent figures were already quite elderly two decades ago. Sadly, the answer to the question “Where are they now?” tends to be “dead.” Nor did they pass away recently, after taking part in the new movie. Tres player Compay Segundo and pianist Rubén González, for example, both died back in 2003. Vocalist Ibrahim Ferrer died in 2005. Adios serves as »

- Mike D'Angelo

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Newswire: Rosario Dawson in talks for New Mutants, every other superhero project

25 May 2017 11:49 AM, PDT

Rosario Dawson has been quietly taking over the superhero genre for the last few years, playing a key role in all of Marvel’s Netflix shows (except the upcoming Punisher series), popping up as Batgirl in The Lego Batman Movie, and even playing Wonder Woman in DC’s animated movies. She was also in Sin City, which was based on a comic book even if it wasn’t about superheroes.

So, with DC and Marvel pretty well covered, Dawson has now set her sights on the X-Men universe, and according to Variety, she’s currently in talks to join director Josh Boone’s “full-fledged horror movie” New Mutants. Dawson would play Dr. Cecilia Reyes, a mentor for the young mutants who has the ability to “generate an invisible bio-field around herself.” Assuming she does get the job, she’ll be appearing alongside Maisie Williams as werewolf girl Wolfsbane and Anya »

- Sam Barsanti

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Newswire: Tonight, The A.V. Club show talks teen spirit and the cosmos with Neil deGrasse Tyson

25 May 2017 11:22 AM, PDT

From ages 9-17 I went to a school that required a uniform, so I, without protest, donned an ill-fitting button-down every day. I was quiet in the hallways, raised my hand before asking questions, and dutifully adhered to all traffic signs. From the outside I had all the markings of your run of the mill Shy Teen Girl.

But as soon I got home from school I’d sprint to my bedroom and turn on Yeah Yeah Yeahs. Or Arctic Monkeys. Or Taylor Swift. And still dressed in that same button-down I’d sing (shout) the lyrics, jumping around that blue room with all my idols, joyfully exhausting myself. I’d stop, catch my breath for a moment, then reload the music video and start the ritual all over again. My favorite line to belt was from Yyy’s “Cheated Hearts.” I’d turn the volume all the way up »

- Keerthi Harishankar

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