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Loving Vincent (2017)

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IN THEATERS
In a story depicted in oil painted animation, a young man comes to the last hometown of painter Vincent van Gogh to deliver the troubled artist's final letter and ends up investigating his final days there.
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159 ( 70)
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 8 wins & 36 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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The Zouave
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La Mousme
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Lieutenant Milliet
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Postman Joseph Roulin
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Louise Chevalier
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Adeline Ravoux
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Joe Stuckey ...
Young Man with a Cornflower
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Old Peasant
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Gendarme Rigaumon
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Doctor Mazery
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Storyline

A year after the death of the artist, Vincent van Gogh, Postman Roulin gets his slacker son, Armand, to hand deliver the artist's final letter written to his now late brother, Theo, to some worthy recipient after multiple failed postal delivery attempts. Although disdainful of this seemingly pointless chore, Armand travels to Auvers-sur-Oise where a purported close companion to Vincent, Dr. Gachet, lives. Having to wait until the doctor returns from business, Armand meets many of the people of that village who not only knew Vincent, but were apparently also models and inspirations for his art. In doing so, Armond becomes increasingly fascinated in the psyche and fate of Van Gogh as numerous suspicious details fail to add up. However, as Armond digs further, he comes to realize that Vincent's troubled life is as much a matter of interpretation as his paintings and there are no easy answers for a man whose work and tragedy would only be truly appreciated in the future. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The truth is, we cannot speak other than by our paintings.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for mature thematic elements, some violence, sexual material and smoking | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Release Date:

22 September 2017 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

La passion Van Gogh  »

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Box Office

Budget:

€5,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$23,180, 24 September 2017, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$6,532,388, 21 January 2018
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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| (flashback sequences)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

It took a team of over 100 professional artists to hand paint every single frame of the movie. According to the official site, the work has resulted in a total of 853 different oil paintings, as each one was used multiple times, painting subsequent frames on the top of the original ones. In the final movie there are exactly 853 different shots. See more »

Goofs

A fly can be seen for a frame, with it being stuck to the real life painting of the frame. See more »

Quotes

Vincent van Gogh: Days seem like weeks to me. Days are weeks.
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Connections

Featured in The 75th Golden Globe Awards (2018) See more »

Soundtracks

Vincent (Starry, Starry Night)
Composed by Don McLean
Performed by Lianne La Havas
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User Reviews

 
Van Gogh's art comes alive
20 September 2017 | by See all my reviews

This beautiful work has made history in the genre of Animation cinema - a precious gift from devoted film-makers. The story is well known - a matter of history. Vincent painted the portrait of Joseph Roulin, Postmaster of Arles. The film tells us the story of Vincent's life and last months before his death on 29 July, 1890 (aged 37) from a self-inflicted gun-shot wound, via the device of the postmaster's son being sent on a mission to deliver a letter from Vincent to his brother, which has been returned. Vincent and his brother Theo were very close, and Theo supported Vincent with regular gifts of money, and painting canvas and tubes of paint. The postmaster Roulin knew and loved Vincent, because these two loving brothers kept up a very frequent correspondence. These letters have been published elsewhere and make very moving reading. The son of Roulin goes to Paris, and to Auvers-sur-Oise where Vincent had been in care after he had an emotional breakdown, and talks to people who knew him. He is at first unwilling, but becomes interested, then passionate to find out the truth of the man whom he is now starting to fully appreciate. The remarkable aspect of this film is that the entire story, 95 minutes of it, is told in hand-painted oil paintings, done in the style of Vincent's own work. Scenes begin with an image that Vincent himself painted and if viewers are familiar with all his works, they will recognize the people and the places. But now they are moving, they are speaking, they are telling their stories, and their impressions of Vincent, the man. Some were fond of him, some ridiculed him. There are various points of view.

Technically the film "Loving Vincent" is a wonder of animation. One hundred artists in two countries, (Poland and Greece) working in Vincent's own style contributed full colour paintings for "the present" and black and white paintings for "the past" as the story is being told by the people who knew Vincent.

The film is made up of 853 'shots', and each one began with a first frame of a full painting on canvas board. As the animation photography was done in 12 frames per second, the first painting, would then be photographed, then painted over, with each gradual change to certain details or all of it, until the last frame of the shot. (This is in place of the use of animation cels, which could not be applied in this style of work.) At the end of the 'shot' the film-makers were left with an oil-painting on canvas board, of the last frame. So at the end of filming 853 paintings remained, and 200 are being auctioned off, and many have already sold, (as can be seen from the films own website) although at the time of writing the film has not yet premiered in the USA. The size of the works was usually 67cm by 49cm. Bear in mind that for one hour of film, 43,200 paintings were required, and you will begin to see the extraordinary ambition of this project. Additionally 90 design paintings were created in the planning stages during the year before shooting started. The purpose of these was to define the style in which the artists would all re-create Vincent's style of painting and make it move, live and breathe. 65,000 painted frames in oils were made for the whole film. The story moves along briskly and is full of wonderful characters (the people in Vincent's life). The dialogue of the characters is full of expression, as are the faces, and the characters have been created to really "live" for us. This was done by casting well known and excellent actors in the main roles, and filming them in live-action, then using those 'normal' cinematic images for a basis of the key paintings for each 'shot'. As the film went on, I recognized (from other films) certain of the painted faces of the real actors, who are also giving voice to the painted characters on the soundtrack. This type of animation has never been done before, and as it took seven years to make the film, it might never be done again. The ingenious planning of how to actually do it is brilliant and has been a great success.

Vincent, who suffered, from what we now call bi-polar disease, was an intelligent, deeply sensitive man, who had a sad childhood in a strict bourgeouis family, and was something of a misfit. He showed immense natural art talent. This can be seen clearly and unmistakably by looking at his early drawing. Later he used brush techniques that imitated the 'signature marks' in his pen and ink works. He was understood and saw visual texture.

From Paris Vincent went to Provence, and lived in Arles. He begged his friend Gaugin to come and join him. Vincent was over-joyed but after a few months, things went wrong between them, and Vincent seemed to become very distressed. When Gaugin departed, he was inconsolable. After the famous incident of cutting of his own ear in his distress, he went into care of Dr Gachet in Auvers, where he found a kindred spirit in Gachet, who loved art, and recovered. There he did quite a few more strong drawings and paintings. Vincent saw the world in a kind of almost violent motion and most of his works, drawings and paintings show this. It's as if the wind was visible to him in the air itself, not only in the resulting movements of trees, and fields of grain, or the moving sea.

He never sold a painting in his own lifetime, but gave away some, and sent many to his brother Theo who attempted to sell them in his Paris art gallery. And yet now his works hold the record as being the most expensive ever sold – which happened in modern times.


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