7.7/10
248
5 user 31 critic

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail (2016)

Not Rated | | Documentary | 7 July 2017 (UK)
A small financial institution called Abacus becomes the only company criminally indicted in the wake of the United States' 2008 mortgage crisis.

Director:

Watch Now

From $4.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

1 win & 4 nominations. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Neil Barofsky ...
Himself
Ti-Hua Chang ...
Herself
...
Herself
Justin Deas ...
Himself
Jiayang Fan ...
Himself
Roman Fuzaylov ...
Himself
Polly Greenberg ...
Herself - Chief, D.A.'s Major Economic Crimes Bureau
Linda Hall ...
Herself
Don Lee ...
Himself
David Lindorff ...
Himself
Kevin Puvalowski ...
Himself
Chanterelle Sung ...
Herself
Heather Sung ...
Herself
Hwei Lin Sung ...
Herself
Jill Sung ...
Herself - Abacus bank executive
Edit

Storyline

A small financial institution called Abacus becomes the only company criminally indicted in the wake of the United States' 2008 mortgage crisis.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

Not Rated
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

7 July 2017 (UK)  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$12,528 (USA) (19 May 2017)

Gross:

$104,621 (USA) (14 July 2017)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Features It's a Wonderful Life (1946) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
David vs Goliath
19 October 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This film received a standing ovation at the Chicago International Film Festival. At the Q and A after the film the family was as genuine as in the movie. Not only is this a story about government picking on the small guy (small by banking standards) but also a nice movie about immigration and family values. The entire movie was shot while filmmaker Steve James (Hoop Dreams) was unaware if the family or bank would be found innocent or guilty of mortgage fraud. Unfortunately the court proceedings are represented by paintings and live audio, but you still get the feeling of being in the courtroom. Even a couple of jurors are interviewed. Do not expect to sit on the edge of your seat with anxiety but a very interesting, thoughtful film


9 of 10 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page